Health Care Law Advisor Blog

The federal No Surprises Act was signed into law in December 2020 and becomes effective on January 1, 2022. Although similar state laws exist elsewhere, Wisconsin does not currently have a “surprise billing” law. As a result, many Wisconsin health care providers will need to take steps to ensure they are complying with the requirements […]

American law long has recognized the authority of government officials to address public health emergencies. Almost 200 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that, under the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the power to address public health emergencies generally is held by the states rather than the federal government. See Gibbons v. Ogden, 22 U.S. […]

The increase in the use of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to new business ventures among medical practices, technology companies and sometimes also venture capitalists.  The relationship between and among the medical practice, the technology component and the financiers must be carefully structured to comply with federal and state law.  If structured […]

As the development of a potential COVID-19 vaccine continues, so too do questions about the types of vaccines being developed and how they will be administered. Vaccines offer overwhelming public health benefits, but a small number of individuals who receive vaccines are harmed by them. Most claims alleging health problems caused by vaccines must be […]

Medical Malpractice Risk & Telemedicine Policies This article is the second of a two-part series on telehealth in Wisconsin. The first article of this series, available here, highlighted basic standards for regulatory compliance in the design of internal telehealth policies. This second article addresses the practitioner’s obligation to minimize patient harm (and thus practitioner liability) […]

I. Expansion of Telehealth to Meet Clinical Need Federal and state governments have resolved traditional barriers to telehealth – including  complexity of billing, lower reimbursement and privacy and security concerns – to facilitate the safe provision of medical services during the COVID-19 pandemic.[i]  The first article in this two-part series highlights basic standards for regulatory […]

These days, litigators are routinely taking depositions and participating in hearings over Zoom or other videoconferencing apps and software. Frequently, these depositions and hearings are set up using videoconferencing systems chosen, hosted, and controlled by a court, an arbitrator, or a court reporter. There has been significant discussion and administrative guidance about the use of […]

Most private health insurance coverage in the United States is employer-sponsored and governed by a federal law known as the Employment Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). Navigating an appeal of a benefit denial issued by an ERISA-governed health plan can be confusing. A quick review of federal regulations governing ERISA benefit denials, which can […]

When selling a medical practice, the physician-owner must consider multiple issues. From understanding the significance of the letter of intent, to complying with medical record transfer laws, to negotiating the purchase agreement, it can feel overwhelming. One item to not overlook is the importance of obtaining medical malpractice insurance tail coverage. To understand what tail […]

Welcome to the first edition of the O’Neil, Cannon, Hollman, DeJong & Laing Health Care Law Advisor. We have created this blog as an informational and educational resource for our clients and contacts. The health care industry changes often and quickly, and we seek to help keep you apprised of important legal developments in the […]

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